Moving to Australia as a progressive in 2016: parliamentary politics, freedom of the press, climate change, surveillance

This is part of a short (albeit growing at the rate of one entry per entry…) series on one person’s perspective on what people might want to know before considering immigrating to Australia as a person with progressive politics, in 2016. The goal of this series is, if there’s issues that affect you and/or you are active in and/or you want to know more about, to give you a capsule summary of the issue from my point of view, with links for further reading. Where I have them, I’ll give details of activists and organisations I follow in the space, … Continue reading Moving to Australia as a progressive in 2016: parliamentary politics, freedom of the press, climate change, surveillance

Moving to Australia as a progressive in 2016: authoritarianism

This is part of a short series on one person’s perspective on what people might want to know before considering immigrating to Australia as a person with progressive politics, in 2016. The series:: Introduction: what I’m doing in this short series and why Logistics: mostly practical issues like the cost of housing, but not entirely depoliticised Authoritarianism: some imperfect thoughts on Australia’s ability to resist Politics I: parliamentary politics, freedom of the press, climate change, surveillance Unpublished: More politics: at least some of Indigenous dispossession, refugee rights, economy and employment, racial equality, LGBT rights, women’s rights, disability rights… Someone I … Continue reading Moving to Australia as a progressive in 2016: authoritarianism

Moving to Australia as a progressive in 2016: logistics

This is part of a short series on one person’s perspective on what people might want to know before considering immigrating to Australia as a person with progressive politics, in 2016. The series:: Introduction: what I’m doing in this short series and why Logistics: mostly practical issues like the cost of housing, but not entirely depoliticised Authoritarianism: some imperfect thoughts on Australia’s ability to resist Politics I: parliamentary politics, freedom of the press, climate change, surveillance Unpublished: More politics: at least some of Indigenous dispossession, refugee rights, economy and employment, racial equality, LGBT rights, women’s rights, disability rights… Money and … Continue reading Moving to Australia as a progressive in 2016: logistics

Moving to Australia as a progressive in 2016: introduction

Many of my US friends are frightened of the Donald Trump presidency for very good reasons. I have no special insight (less so than them) but the bad and worst cases seem very very frightening to me too, far more so than for a typical Republican or generally conservative government. Some folks I know are considering or actively planning emigration and I greatly sympathise, although I don’t know what I would choose or when I would pursue my choice. This has caused me to think over what I know about Australia, good, bad, and terrible, Hopefully if you are considering … Continue reading Moving to Australia as a progressive in 2016: introduction

Learning more about a remote working position

I’m in the process of wrapping up a long period of working remotely at least part-time from home, beginning in 2006 when I enrolled in a PhD program and continuing through my time at the Ada Initiative and at Stripe to this year. My take on working remotely in future is really “it depends on the details” (and likely different details for different organizations). To that end, I contributed some suggested questions you could ask to Hypothesis’s Working remotely guide, which they’ve incorporated in a slightly edited form. Here’s my original questions; I’ve also added a few more at my … Continue reading Learning more about a remote working position

Tech interviews, too much homework, and the motherhood question

There’s a fascinating discussion around technical interviews recently; would both candidate experience and hiring signal be improved by revising the current round of (basically Google-inspired) non-runnable algorithm-centric coding examples completed under time pressure? I’ve been following Thomas Ptacek’s tweets about it for a few months, for example: “We could have you write and test code like a normal person, but instead we interview you based on something utterly unlike coding”. — Thomas H. Ptacek (@tqbf) March 28, 2016 @gayle @edropple Yes, I DEFINITELY think no interview better than algorithm interview. — Thomas H. Ptacek (@tqbf) March 9, 2015 Then last … Continue reading Tech interviews, too much homework, and the motherhood question

Facts to definitely give when advertising your event, an incomplete list

The year. Otherwise your event for the 18th April might be in a few weeks, or it may be a stale webpage from your very successful and very over event in 2004. The weekday. Otherwise I can’t intersect your event’s day and my (ridiculously complicated) personal calendar in my head and figure out if this is a Tuesday probably-I-could-swing-it event or a Wednesday nope-I’ll-be-in-Melbourne event without authenticating to some device and opening my calendar navigating to the day and… SQUIRREL. If you are kind-hearted, you could add a few of very very many pieces of information suggested in the AdaCamp … Continue reading Facts to definitely give when advertising your event, an incomplete list

Remembering Telsa Gwynne

Telsa Gwynne, whom I knew through my time in the LinuxChix community between 2000 and around 2007, died this week: Last night my friend Telsa Gwynne died, after a long battle with cancer. Beloved of many in the Open Source community, we shall all miss her — Alec Muffett (@AlecMuffett) November 3, 2015 Telsa is the direct inspiration for the entire 15 years of content on this website, especially the personal diary. Before joining LinuxChix, I first knew Telsa through her online diary (its archival title, “This was a diary, once”, is painful to read now), which I heard about … Continue reading Remembering Telsa Gwynne