Sunday Spam: bagels, lox and smoked salmon

In belated honour of my breakfast in New York, Sunday July 8. Baby Loss and the Pain Olympics Warning for baby loss discussion. I really have to question why seeing someone else processing their emotions is her pet peeve. Do I believe a miscarriage and neonatal death is the same thing — of course not. If they were the same thing, they would share the same term. But just because I see them as apples and oranges doesn’t mean that I don’t also see them as fruit. They are both loss. The deadly scandal in the building trade Readers would … Continue reading Sunday Spam: bagels, lox and smoked salmon

Meet the Ada Initiative: supporters party, San Francisco, Mon July 16

I’m in the US for a couple of weeks. The Ada Initiative, my non-profit organisation supporting women in open technology and culture, is having a party while I am there: We invite you to join us in downtown San Francisco for an informal meetup! Ada Initiative co-founders Mary Gardiner and Valerie Aurora will be there, along with many of our board members and advisors. Mary is visiting San Francisco on her way back from keynoting the Wikimania conference, and wants to meet as many Bay area Ada Initiative supporters as she can. Date: Monday July 16 Time: 7:30pm to 9:00pm … Continue reading Meet the Ada Initiative: supporters party, San Francisco, Mon July 16

On opting out

Captain Awkward has a thread on lateness and keeping in contact with people who are constantly late or no-shows. Her answer is worth reading, because she takes both sides seriously: the way being late feeds into anxiety or depression disorders sometimes (and has for her), and the way to structure social engagements with people who are in that place (whether due to mental health issues or not, it doesn’t require disclosure). She’s specifically asked that people who are good with time and todo lists (I am, relatively) not drop in with “handy hints”, which is fair enough, but now I’m … Continue reading On opting out

Getting a passport in Australia

See Lindsey Kuper on a expedited US passport, here we have another “life in Australia” comparison piece. Step 1: obtain passport form. If you are an adult renewing an existing adult passport that has been expired for less than 24 months, you can do this online. Otherwise, obtain form from nearest post office. Step 2: track down someone — usually just another passport holder — to be your photo referee (ie, to agree that it is you in the picture). Gather relevant documentation, that is, proof of identity and of citizenship. If you were born in Australia on or after … Continue reading Getting a passport in Australia

Should you give birth privately?

A few people have been researching their options over the last few years about giving birth in Australia, and have asked me what I think about having private health insurance or giving birth in a private hospital. Background: maybe you shouldn’t ask me! I’m not a health professional, I’m a mother of one, and he was born in a public hospital, in which I was a public patient. And now, crucial fact about private hospital cover: it pays much of your hospital stay fees and some of your doctor’s in-hospital fees. It does not pay for private consultations with a … Continue reading Should you give birth privately?

Come to AdaCamp DC, July 10–11

From the Ada Initiative blog: Applications now open for AdaCamp DC © Bernt Rostad, CC Attribution Applications for AdaCamp DC are now open – apply now! AdaCamp DC will be July 10 – 11, 2012, in Washington DC, co-located with Wikimania 2012. We are likely to have more applications than available slots, so apply now to have the best chance of attending. Applications close June 15 (May 11 for those requesting travel assistance). Who should apply AdaCamp DC will bring together a wide variety of people from open technology and culture, all of whom are working to support women in … Continue reading Come to AdaCamp DC, July 10–11

Nannies and flexibility

Liam Hogan tweeted: Further on rebates for nannies: if they’re a response to family-unfriendly working hours, flexible childcare is solving the wrong problem. Here’s some systemic problems with childcare as it currently stands that one might hire a nanny as a possible solution to: availability (strong form) For under 2s in Sydney, you simply might not get a childcare place accessible to you, by your scheduled return to work. Full-stop. availability (weaker form) You have 2 or 3 children under 5, not uncommon. If you do get childcare places for them all, they (a) start to approach the price of … Continue reading Nannies and flexibility

The practical reality of contraception, Australian edition

Background the first: The practical reality of contraception: A guide for men, by Valerie Aurora, about contraception in the US Background the second: A layperson’s intro to paying for healthcare in Australia which I wrote as specific background to this post. Things that are the same in Australia Contraception works the same way! The side-effect risks are the same: Let’s start with estrogen-based hormonal birth control and health. I know women who get life-threatening blood clots on estrogen birth control (if the clot gets lodged in a blood vessel, effects range from loss of a limb to death). Others have … Continue reading The practical reality of contraception, Australian edition

A layperson's intro to paying for healthcare in Australia

I wanted to write a comparison post to Valerie’s The practical reality of contraception: A guide for men about the Australian equivalents. However, I realised a background in the Australian healthcare system might be needed. Hence this post. Caution: I am not a medical professional or health administrator. There are plenty of details of healthcare payment in Australia I am blissfully unaware of. This is a guide to what it is like to pay for healthcare in Australia as a relatively healthy younger woman. Summary In Australia, many people in cities can see doctors mostly for free, and get free … Continue reading A layperson's intro to paying for healthcare in Australia

Book review: Steve Jobs

Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs. It is the day in Australia to be thinking about poor leadership and its sequelae. And coincidentally I’ve just finished up everyone’s favourite summer hardback brick (all hail the Kindle), the authorised Steve Jobs biography, and I just read this today too: However, sometimes really smart employees develop agendas other than improving the company. Rather than identifying weaknesses, so that he can fix them, he looks for faults to build his case. Specifically, he builds his case that the company is hopeless and run by a bunch of morons. The smarter the employee, the more destructive … Continue reading Book review: Steve Jobs